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EnglishOut of the top 50 cryptocurrencies, can you give me a list of the ones that have a confirmed backdoor for Nation States/organizations?

Interested on finding how shield proof they are. All answers submitted must be verifiable with confirmed source. If you don't know the answer or what I am talking about, don't bother commenting. Wasting your time, mines and reporting you to the admin. Thanks

briae39 1 month ago
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  • Cryptocurrencies
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dee 1 month ago
I don't think there are any in the top 50. That's why many countries are trying to create laws to do that by blaming terrorism and money laundering. Outside of the top 50, China seems to be getting there with their digital yuan.
briae39 1 month ago
I am sure that there must be some kind of agreement between the current top 50. That's why I am asking.
dee 1 month ago
Maybe the closest agreement they have is between the exchanges and the governments. KYC implementation to use their services. Most blockchains seem to be pretty secure for the most part.
https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.theverge.com/platform/amp/2020/12/22/22195834/cryptocurrency-fincen-regulations-private-wallets
Souhail 1 month ago
https://twitter.com/jaafarsaker56/status/1371113746077212674?s=19
cyberx 1 month ago
I don't there are any, but am always surprised how they catch people laundrying money with Bitcoin
Scott 1 month ago
I don't know about top notch. Under new proposed guidelines from the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network, it might turn out to be a lot simpler for the public authority to follow bitcoin exchanges. And keeping in mind that there's presently a 15-day remark period open, cryptographic money trade Coinbase and the Electronic Frontier Foundation are calling foul since that period incorporates Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year's Eve, and New Year's Day.

The proposed guidelines being referred to, which were recorded at 4:20PM ET on December eighteenth, are about private wallets. Suppose I am a renowned and extravagant cryptographic money financial backer, and I do some exchanging on Coinbase. On the off chance that I have my own private wallet that I need to move my cash to, I should recognize myself as the wallet's proprietor in case I'm sending more than $3,000 in an exchange. Also, in the event that I need to work with another person who has a private wallet, I need to tell the trade some lovely itemized individual data. The trades are then needed to store records of this and turn them over on demand.

THIS NEW KNOW-YOUR-CUSTOMER REQUIREMENT IS, AT MINIMUM, A COMPLETE PAIN IN THE ASS

Additionally under the proposed guideline, a trade would be needed to report my own data in the event that I make an aggregate of more than $10,000 in exchanges in a single day. You can perceive any reason why Coinbase — or some other trade — would see this new know-your-client necessity, at least, as a total undeniable irritation.

It's likewise the most amusing advancement in digital currency's unexpected history; conceived from an abnormal gathering of the libertarians, rebels, and utopians, cryptographic money vowed to be an approach to execute totally secretly, in a trustless framework. Bitcoin, the world's greatest digital money, emerged soon after the 2008 monetary emergency as an option in contrast to banks — yet these new guidelines will make cryptographic money trades act much more like banks. Taken working together with another standard change about worldwide exchanges, it might flag that digital money's wild years are finished — and secrecy will be more diligently to discover.

Digital money trades make it simple to move from dollars (or whatever) into a cryptographic money and the other way around. That additionally implies that they make digital money available to more individuals. The current FinCEN proposition makes more work for these trades andfor individuals working inside them just as subverting the namelessness for which cryptographic money is celebrated. Taken in mix with another new proposed rule change about how to report cryptographic money that crosses borders, you can perceive any reason why some digital currency devotees are apprehensive.

There are some solid results to this, the EFF brings up. To begin with, it makes namelessness more troublesome in an exchange between a private wallet and one facilitated by a trade administration. Second, the proposed enactment likewise makes it less interesting to have a private wallet.

Be that as it may, the third issue is the genuine kick in the ass: some digital currencies, including bitcoin, record all exchanges openly. That implies on the off chance that I am exchanging bitcoin into my private wallet from a trade, I need to send a lot of distinguishing data about that wallet, which is then conceivably accessible to the US government. Since when you realize a particular wallet address is mine, you know each bitcoin exchange I have at any point made with that wallet. This signifies "that the public authority may approach an enormous measure of information past exactly what the guideline implies to cover," the EFF composes.

So bitcoin, a digital money made to guarantee obscurity, would guarantee precisely the inverse under these principles. However, I assume, with a little inventiveness, it's conceivable to get around them; you essentially make a wallet for the know-your-client rules, at that point move your cash from that point into a second private wallet.

Yesterday, Coinbase's boss legitimate advice, Paul Grewal, gave a reaction to FinCEN, grumbling about the multi day time frame for remarks on this standard change: "FinCEN requested that general society give remarks in only 15 days, spreading over Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year's Eve, and New Year's Day, in a worldwide pandemic — leaving simply a modest bunch of real working days for remarks."

Coinbase is requesting a multi day audit period — which is the standard. The more limited audit time of only 15 days is on the grounds that the Treasury Department says "huge public safety objectives" mean this needs to move quicker. The facts confirm that some cryptographic money exchanges are criminal — The Silk Road was a huge piece of bitcoin's set of experiences, all things considered. The proposed decide says that digital currencies "encourage global psychological oppressor financing, weapons multiplication, sanctions avoidance, and transnational tax evasion," among its clothing rundown of expected culpability.

However, it's difficult to tell how genuine that is, since 60 days from now, digital currency trades would manage the Biden organization as opposed to the active Trump organization. "There is no crisis here; there is just an active organization endeavoring to sidestep the necessary meeting with general society to finish a hurried standard before their time in office is done," Grewal composed.

Notwithstanding the 15-day or 60-day time span, it seems like the Treasury Department is endeavoring to make an impression on any would-be cypherpunks: you can't beat the current monetary world — you can just go along with it.
Vinay dinesh 1 month ago
I don't there are any, but am always surprised how they catch people laundrying money with Bitcoin
aslanas 1 month ago
I think governments temporarily rely on some cryptocurrency. I'll make a list and write it down as soon as I can.
Necking 1 month ago
I think governments temporarily rely on some cryptocurrency. I'll make a list and write it down as soon as I can.
Sinenkosi MTHUPHA 1 month ago
none at this point my guy/ but there seems to be rumours about Bitcoin, yeah ain't nothing said yet from the company, we looking to forward to finding out.

peace out...
Patrik Mcd 1 month ago
https://blogs.thomsonreuters.com/answerson/world-cryptocurrencies-country/

Argentina– Bitcoins are not legal currency strictly speaking, since they are not issued by the government monetary authority and are not legal tender. Therefore, they may be considered money but not legal currency, since they are not a mandatory means of cancelling debts or obligations.
Australia – Removing Bitcoins from double taxation policies, the government also legalized Bitcoin and said it can be used just like money.
Austria – Austria has not regulated virtual currencies and has not issued a cohesive policy on how to treat virtual currency.
Bangladesh – Bangladesh Bank issued a warning against conducting transactions in cryptocurrency, and reportedly stated that such use is punishable by up to 12 years in jail.
Belgium – It has refused to issue any stance regarding Bitcoin and along with a whole host of other countries is waiting for European wide guidance. They have issued a public warning that there is no Government oversight.
Bolivia – The Bolivian government has banned the use of Bitcoin in the belief that it will allow tax evasion and monetary instability.
Brazil – The Brazilian government has declared that Bitcoin is not a currency but an asset and therefore subject to 15 percent capital gains taxes above a threshold.
Bulgaria – Bulgaria has accepted the digital currency. Its National Revenue Agency had issued new taxation guidelines stating that income from the sale of digital currencies such as Bitcoin will be treated as income from the sale of financial assets and taxed at a rate of 10 percent.
Canada – In November 2013, the Canada Revenue Agency declared that Bitcoin payments should be treated as barter transactions. The Canadian federal government also announced its intention to regulate Bitcoin through its anti-money laundering and counter-terrorist financing legislation.
Chile – The first Bitcoin exchange in Chile, where citizens can buy Bitcoin with pesos, launched in 2015 with funding from the Chilean government. This would appear to be in line with the Chilean government’s ambition to transform itself into an innovation and entrepreneurial hub for Latin America. The government has also committed to providing regulation and oversight in the form of financial audits and anti-money laundering regulation.
China – In late 2013, China’s Central Bank (the People’s Bank of China) barred financial institutions from partaking in digital currency and Bitcoin transactions, but individuals are free to trade as they wish – Chinese yuan to Bitcoin is the most traded daily fiat to Bitcoin pair.
Colombia – It has decreed that cryptocurrency is not illegal, but at the same time it won’t be getting legal recognition any time soon.
Croatia – On December 6, 2013, the Croatian National Bank (CNB) reportedly conducted a discussion on the circulation of digital currencies and concluded that the Bitcoin is not illegal in Croatia.
Cyprus -The use of Bitcoins is not regulated in Cyprus. On December 11, 2013, the Central Bank of Cyprus issued a statement on Bitcoins, stating that “it considers the use of any kind of virtual money as particularly dangerous, given that it is not under any regulatory system and its operation is unchecked.”
Czech Republic – The Czech government recently introduced a law requiring virtual currency exchanges determine the identity of customers. Alongside this, the country’s authorities will also soon add a Value Added Tax (VAT) to virtual currencies in the near future.
Denmark – The Danish government and Financial Supervisory Authority have announced that Bitcoin businesses will be taxed in a normal manner, and individuals will not be subject to taxation from trading. “The Danish central bank is considering a digital-only e-krone.”
Ecuador – The Ecuadorian government has banned all Bitcoin use in the hope of promulgating its own digital currency based on the principles of Bitcoin.
Estonia – Bitcoins and digital currencies could be declared as an alternative payment means, subjecting them to capital gains liabilities and VAT.
Finland – The Finnish regulatory body has declared that Bitcoin should be treated as an asset and be subject to VAT and capital gains, although the capital gains losses would not be deductible.
France – The French government has shown some interest in the technology, but according to pundits has yet to launch major initiatives in the field.
Germany – The German government released a report in August 2013 saying that Bitcoins should be treated as a trading activity and therefore be subject to capital gains taxes unless they were held for a year or more. The German Federal Ministry of Finance further clarified its position by saying that Bitcoin should be treated as a unit of account and private money and should therefore be subject to sales taxes and VAT.
Greece – No specific legislation on Bitcoins exists in Greece, nor has the National Bank of Greece issued any statement on Bitcoins. A private company has listed a few businesses that accept Bitcoins as a form of payment, however.
Hong Kong – Hong Kong Money Authority doesn’t formally ban a bank from trading Bitcoin, but no bank has asked for permission, and it’s pretty clear that no bank has asked for permission because the answer is likely to be “no.”
Hungary – The National Bank of Hungary (MNB) has issued a public statement warning citizens who use or invest in cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin, citing their unregulated nature amid increasing instances of high-return investment schemes abusing the cryptocurrency.
Iceland – The government, worried about capital flight, has banned Bitcoin.
India – While Bitcoin is already being widely used in India, there is still “no clear law stating whether Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies are legal in India.”
Indonesia – Bitcoin has penetrated deeper into the Indonesian market even though there is currently no legal umbrella for the currency’s use in the country.
Iran – The Iranian Central Bank has adopted a “wait-and-see” policy toward cryptocurrencies. While trading cryptocurrencies is illegal, the police have no legal mandate to stop it and a study by a group of 15 official bodies started to work on a framework for regulating digital currencies in the country back in 2013.
Ireland – Cryptocurrency is still unregulated in Ireland, but the Bank of Ireland’s innovation team has overseen experiments with Deloitte that showed blockchain technology could be used to automatically trace transactions in line with forthcoming EU finance rules.
Israel – Israel’s government is set to apply capital gains tax to Bitcoin sales, categorizing digital currencies as a type of property.
Italy – Tax authorities appear to be treating Bitcoin as a form of currency. They have clarified purchases and sales made with Bitcoin remain exempt from VAT. However, Italian tax officials appear to be applying income tax to speculative uses of Bitcoin, or events in which money is made during a sale or purchase. Those buying Bitcoins outside of the scope of speculative activity, it indicates, aren’t required to pay income tax.
Japan – Japan has eliminated the consumption tax on Bitcoin trading on April 1, 2017, when it officially declared Bitcoin as a legal tender. Japan also eliminated the possibility of double taxation on trading of Bitcoins.
Kazakhstan – Seeking to become the regional hub for cryptocurrencies. In June 2017, Kazakhstan announced plans to begin selling blockchain based bonds, and the country’s President announced that, “It is high time to look into the possibility of launching the international payment unit. It will help the world get rid of monetary wars, black marketeering and decrease volatility at markets.”
Kenya – The Central Bank of Kenya (CBK) has warned that virtual currency is insecure and could fund terrorism.
Kyrgyzstan – The Kyrgyzstan government has completely banned the use of Bitcoin within its national borders.
Latvia – The government issued a warning about Bitcoins and other digital currencies a day after the national airline carrier announced that it would accept Bitcoin as an alternative payment method for flights.
Lebanon – Lebanon’s Central Bank issued a Bitcoin warning in 2013, raising a number of risks associated with digital currencies, and pointing out that issuance and use of “e-money” is prohibited under a decree issued in 2000. The warning prohibited the use of Bitcoin by financial institutions in the country, but left the situation for private citizens unclear.
Lithuania – The Lithuanian government has declared a wait and see policy as the regulatory landscape evolves across Europe.
Luxembourg – In April 2016, it granted a payment institution license to a Bitcoin exchange, making the company the first nationally licensed Bitcoin exchange in the world.
Malaysia – Bitcoin is not recognized as legal tender, and Bank Negara Malaysia does not regulate the operations of Bitcoin. The central bank has advised the public to be cautious of the risks associated with the use of such digital currency.
Mexico – The Mexican government has not banned the use of alternative digital currencies outright but instead is in talks with government regulators to try and introduce their own form of Bitcoin and their own blockchain specific to Mexico.
The Netherlands – In June 2013, the Dutch Finance Minister released a report that gave Bitcoin the status of an item of barter, meaning it needed no specific licensing or compliance requirements. He said, “Bitcoin is not a financial product as defined by law; purchase or sale of Bitcoins is not a financial service either, so the financial services act does not apply.”
New Zealand – The Reserve Bank regards cryptocurrencies as a “vulnerability” and considers cryptocurrency as a payment system rather than a currency.
Nigeria – On January 19, 2017, the Central Bank of Nigeria “officially outlawed digital currencies.” The CBN cited reasons like money laundering and terror financing to prohibit banks to use, hold or transact virtual currencies, and they should ensure “existing customers that are virtual currency traders have effective AML/CFT controls.”
Norway – The Norwegian tax authorities declared at the end of 2013 that “Bitcoins don’t fall under the usual definition of money or currency” and therefore making them subject to the usual capital gains tax laws, but Norway’s largest online-only bank, Skandiabanken, recently announced plans to offer clients the ability to link their regular bank accounts with their Coinbase account.
Pakistan – The Pakistani government hasn’t taken any stance on Bitcoin as yet; it believes that Bitcoin is a commodity and not a currency.
Philippines – In February 2017, BSP the Philippine Central Bank said it plans to officially regulate local Philippine Bitcoin exchanges as remittance companies and recognize Bitcoin as a legitimate payment method, while issuing a proper regulatory framework for Bitcoin users, exchanges and companies.
Poland – It has officially recognized the trading and mining of virtual currencies as an “official economic activity” but has said that regulation should come from the EU.
Portugal – Taxable, but unregulated.
Russia – The Russian Deputy Finance Minister has stated that regulators will be looking to recognize Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies legally next year. The government is eager to tackle money laundering, which certainly incentivizes greater oversight and regulation, ultimately leading to its legitimacy.
Singapore – In early 2014, the Singapore government declared Bitcoin as a good purchased to purchase goods and therefore subject to a specific tax. The Monetary Authority of Singapore then required exchanges and ATM providers to Green-list, or de-anonymize their users to allow while simultaneously declaring that virtual currencies such as Bitcoin are not securities and not subject to regulation.
Slovenia – Slovenia took a middle road in December 2013 in declaring that Bitcoin was neither a financial asset nor a currency and should be taxed based on the circumstance it was used, whether it was via trading profits or through mining.
South Africa – The South African Revenue Service has stated that any transaction or speculation in Bitcoin is subject to general tax rules; it has added that it is the responsibility of both citizens and residents of South Africa to report each and every Bitcoin transaction detail to the South African Revenue Service.
South Korea – There are currently no laws in South Korea regulating the use of Bitcoin, where people are able to buy Bitcoin in 7-Elevens.
Spain – Notable among EU members, Spain is lobbying to establish a cryptocurrency regulatory framework. The Spanish government has confirmed that cryptocurrencies are exempt from Value Added Tax, and Spain has whole streets full with Bitcoin-friendly stores. Plus, many Bitcoin companies call Spain their home, and Spanish banks BBVA and Bankinter now invest in Bitcoin companies.
Sweden ­– Looking to shift to digital currency, the central bank’s decision to cut interest rates into negative territory has led to an increase in demand, supporting appetite for Bitcoins and alternatives to protect capital. Unlike neighboring Denmark, the Swedish regulator has publicly declared Bitcoin as a legal currency.
Switzerland – Switzerland’s financial markets regulator has approved the first Swiss private bank for Bitcoin asset management, potentially paving the way for other global banks to offer digital currency products.
Taiwan –Taiwan’s Financial Supervisory Commission has indicated its stance on Bitcoin remains neutral despite recent speculation it was moving toward more restrictive policies.
Thailand – In 2013, the Thai central bank declared the use of Bitcoin illegal in Thailand, but changed its opinion in early 2014 to make it not illegal. However, buying Bitcoin in Thailand and then selling it outside the country was still strictly prohibited.
Turkey – The Turkish authorities have issued guidance saying that Bitcoin does not meet the standards of electronic money and that the volatility leaves users with a high level of risk; a major Bitcoin exchange has ceased operations after local banks closed the main accounts of the company without prior notice.
Uganda – Unregulated but not illegal; the Bank of Uganda has asked Ugandans to stay away from Bitcoin and other digital currencies.
Ukraine – Despite vague Government regulations and political uncertainty in some areas, a major bank announced the ability to purchase Bitcoins in any of its nationwide ATM terminals.
United Arab Emirates – The exact status of cryptocurrencies is currently under review.
United Kingdom– The Bank of England continues to monitor Bitcoin technology, while it continues to be classified as private money, with VAT applied and also subject to capital gains tax, where there P&Ls are involved.
United States – The U.S. has the highest number of cryptocurrency users, the highest number of Bitcoin ATMs and also the highest Bitcoin trading volumes globally. However, there is a differing picture state by state: Texas, Kansas, Tennessee, South Carolina and Montana appear to be the friendliest based on state regulation, whereas New York, New Hampshire, Connecticut, Hawaii, Georgia, North Carolina, Washington and New Mexico have regulations not favorable to virtual currency. The other 37 states/territories are gray areas currently.
Venezuela – Government crackdown arrests and torture of those found using Bitcoin, despite growing popularity of use by the people.
Vietnam – The government has moved from banning Bitcoin in 2014 to now wanting to streamline the industry so as to be able to tax, monitor and eliminate any so-called negative impacts.
Zimbabwe – The country is not yet ready for regulation, says a government regulator.
abderrahim 1 month ago
Cryptocurrencies have enjoyed some success; Bitcoin is now the largest cryptocurrency, with the total number of Bitcoins currently valued at approximately USD$70 billion. Research produced by Cambridge University concluded this year that there are between 2.9 million and 5.8 million unique users actively using a cryptocurrency wallet.

In this research, we’ve looked at governmental attitudes toward cryptocurrencies, not limited to Bitcoin alone. The picture produced across the world is patchy. Some countries have become global advocates, while others have actively banned cryptocurrencies completely, with various shades in between.

The most notable disrupter is Japan, which has passed a law accepting Bitcoin as legal tender. At the other end of the spectrum, Bangladesh passed a law in 2014 stating that anybody caught using the virtual currency could be jailed under the country’s strict anti-money-laundering laws.

Whatever the individual case for a country, the growth in cryptocurrencies in the last decade has shown that there is strong momentum around this new technology.
Joseph 1 month ago
Check out mine ☺
https://cutt.ly/NzG2AlI
Mehrzad 1 month ago
I don't know about top notch. Under new proposed guidelines from the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network, it might turn out to be a lot simpler for the public authority to follow bitcoin exchanges. And keeping in mind that there's presently a 15-day remark period open, cryptographic money trade Coinbase and the Electronic Frontier Foundation are calling foul since that period incorporates Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year's Eve, and New Year's Day
Helen Ajuonu 1 month ago
I don't think there are any, but am surprised how they catch people laundrying money with Bitcoin.
Hectortrex 4 weeks ago
Neo and EOS
Alongside Ripple and yearn
VERGIL DEMATERA 3 weeks ago
LUNA-Backed by terra organization a backdoor for lunar exploration facilities. CHNG-china's crypto, HYDRA-hydro electric companies generating in the USA, USDT-backed by the USA dollar and central bank, MONERO-Brazil's leading crypto for anti inflation. NANO-Technological breakthrough crypto for 20+ companies and BTC-bitcoin founded by satoshi and his innovation team for the economy.

My nano address(I'll appreciate it):

nano_38mbznyyruujybnwkt3afetxp31fj1hddjdz71wfpxsh4z6s64xzcfexdhbo
Shashank 3 weeks ago
I don't know about top notch. Under new proposed guidelines from the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network, it might turn out to be a lot simpler for the public authority to follow bitcoin exchanges. And keeping in mind that there's presently a 15-day remark period open, cryptographic money trade Coinbase and the Electronic Frontier Foundation are calling foul since that period incorporates Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year's Eve, and New Year's Day.

The proposed guidelines being referred to, which were recorded at 4:20PM ET on December eighteenth, are about private wallets. Suppose I am a renowned and extravagant cryptographic money financial backer, and I do some exchanging on Coinbase. On the off chance that I have my own private wallet that I need to move my cash to, I should recognize myself as the wallet's proprietor in case I'm sending more than $3,000 in an exchange. Also, in the event that I need to work with another person who has a private wallet, I need to tell the trade some lovely itemized individual data. The trades are then needed to store records of this and turn them over on demand.

THIS NEW KNOW-YOUR-CUSTOMER REQUIREMENT IS, AT MINIMUM, A COMPLETE PAIN IN THE ASS

Additionally under the proposed guideline, a trade would be needed to report my own data in the event that I make an aggregate of more than $10,000 in exchanges in a single day. You can perceive any reason why Coinbase — or some other trade — would see this new know-your-client necessity, at least, as a total undeniable irritation.

It's likewise the most amusing advancement in digital currency's unexpected history; conceived from an abnormal gathering of the libertarians, rebels, and utopians, cryptographic money vowed to be an approach to execute totally secretly, in a trustless framework. Bitcoin, the world's greatest digital money, emerged soon after the 2008 monetary emergency as an option in contrast to banks — yet these new guidelines will make cryptographic money trades act much more like banks. Taken working together with another standard change about worldwide exchanges, it might flag that digital money's wild years are finished — and secrecy will be more diligently to discover.

Digital money trades make it simple to move from dollars (or whatever) into a cryptographic money and the other way around. That additionally implies that they make digital money available to more individuals. The current FinCEN proposition makes more work for these trades andfor individuals working inside them just as subverting the namelessness for which cryptographic money is celebrated. Taken in mix with another new proposed rule change about how to report cryptographic money that crosses borders, you can perceive any reason why some digital currency devotees are apprehensive.

There are some solid results to this, the EFF brings up. To begin with, it makes namelessness more troublesome in an exchange between a private wallet and one facilitated by a trade administration. Second, the proposed enactment likewise makes it less interesting to have a private wallet.

Be that as it may, the third issue is the genuine kick in the ass: some digital currencies, including bitcoin, record all exchanges openly. That implies on the off chance that I am exchanging bitcoin into my private wallet from a trade, I need to send a lot of distinguishing data about that wallet, which is then conceivably accessible to the US government. Since when you realize a particular wallet address is mine, you know each bitcoin exchange I have at any point made with that wallet. This signifies "that the public authority may approach an enormous measure of information past exactly what the guideline implies to cover," the EFF composes.

So bitcoin, a digital money made to guarantee obscurity, would guarantee precisely the inverse under these principles. However, I assume, with a little inventiveness, it's conceivable to get around them; you essentially make a wallet for the know-your-client rules, at that point move your cash from that point into a second private wallet.

Yesterday, Coinbase's boss legitimate advice, Paul Grewal, gave a reaction to FinCEN, grumbling about the multi day time frame for remarks on this standard change: "FinCEN requested that general society give remarks in only 15 days, spreading over Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year's Eve, and New Year's Day, in a worldwide pandemic — leaving simply a modest bunch of real working days for remarks."

Coinbase is requesting a multi day audit period — which is the standard. The more limited audit time of only 15 days is on the grounds that the Treasury Department says "huge public safety objectives" mean this needs to move quicker. The facts confirm that some cryptographic money exchanges are criminal — The Silk Road was a huge piece of bitcoin's set of experiences, all things considered. The proposed decide says that digital currencies "encourage global psychological oppressor financing, weapons multiplication, sanctions avoidance, and transnational tax evasion," among its clothing rundown of expected culpability.

However, it's difficult to tell how genuine that is, since 60 days from now, digital currency trades would manage the Biden organization as opposed to the active Trump organization. "There is no crisis here; there is just an active organization endeavoring to sidestep the necessary meeting with general society to finish a hurried standard before their time in office is done," Grewal composed.

Notwithstanding the 15-day or 60-day time span, it seems like the Treasury Department is endeavoring to make an impression on any would-be cypherpunks: you can't beat the current monetary world — you can just go along with it.
Okaku cletus 3 weeks ago
I buybitcoin at cool rate .get paid instantly..dm me on WhatsApp+2347068802410. from $50-$10000
Noah Henri Merlin 3 weeks ago
I'm not sure but I think that for the moment most of the governments like China or the USA have agreements in sight
https://www.theverge.com/2020/12/22/22195834/cryptocurrency-fincen-regulations-private-wallets
yusuf öztürk 2 weeks ago
Bitcoin (BTC): Bitcoin was created in 2008 by a person or team nicknamed Satoshi Nakamoto.
an owner and decentralized payment tool that comes to life with the document it has published and
is the currency. It is not affiliated with any institution or organization. Representation or
It has no dealers. It is a technology available to everyoneEthereum (ETH): Founder Vitalik at the North American Bitcoin Conference for the first time
Ethereum, introduced by Buterin, to develop its own blockchain
platform, lower fees and faster than Bitcoin
offers transactions.
 Ripple (XRP): Money transfer anywhere in the world with transactions that take 3 seconds in total
and is one of the fastest in cryptocurrencies. Platform, SWIFT or
Competing with legacy international money transfer systems such as Western Union
is designed for. Ripple needs more to make real-time payments worldwide.
with dozens of banks to offer an efficient and cost-effective way
works.
 EOS (EOS): A crypto that focuses on the critical hot spots of blockchain technology
is money, and speed that often becomes a bottleneck for Blockchain-based systems,
It tries to solve scalability and flexibility problems.
 Litecoin (LTC): Designed by Charlie Lee, a former Google employee.
Bitcoin is the "gold" of cryptocurrencies and as a value for long-term purposes, Litecoin
as the "silver" of cryptocurrencies and as a transaction tool for cheaper and daily purposes.
is seen.
 Binance Coin (BNB): Binance Coin is the best known crypto currency based in Malta
It is a crypto money produced by Binance, one of the exchanges. trade volume
behind Binance, the world's largest cryptocurrency exchange.
Binance Coin has seen a rapid rise in recent times and
It is predicted that Binance will continue to accelerate with further breakthroughs.
are being.
 Cardano (ADA): Cardano solves all known problems of existing Blockchain systems.
It was created with the intention of solving. Developed with a scientific approach and peer-reviewed
cryptocurrency built on academic research
Its focus is scalability, interoperability and flexibility.
Ekene 2 weeks ago
I don't think there is any
gilad 1 week ago
not sure
aniket 5 days ago
Argentina
Australia
Austria
Bangladesh
Belgium
Bolivia
Brazil
Canada
Chile
China
Colombia
Croatia
Cyprus
Czech Republic
Denmark
Ecuador
Estonia
Finland
France
Germany
Greece.
Hong Kong
Hungary
Iceland
Indonesia
Iran
Ireland
Israel
Italy
Japan
Kazakhstan
Kenya
Kyrgyzstan
Latvia
Lebanon
Lithuania
Luxembourg
Malaysia
Mexico
Netherlands
New Zealand
Norway
Pakistan
Philippines
Poland
Russia
bitcoincash:qq9tktjrpt4z4pp2sz94h9u9xjaglgpxyuld0sfle8 thanks